dairy and holistic pain relief

Posted by on Jul 3, 2014 in Anti-Inflammatory Ideas, Healthier Choices, Holistic Pain Relief | 0 comments

SpilledMilkWhen I was a kid I hated the taste of milk. There aren’t many things I would use the word “hate” for, but I did (and still do) hate milk. Unfortunately for me, my dad just loved milk. He drank almost two gallons of skim milk every week throughout his life. As a kid, I was required to drink a glass of milk with every meal. But some days I just couldn’t stomach another glass. I’d eat my whole meal, never touching the milk. Maybe I thought it would magically disappear, or that somehow I’d be off the hook. But that magic never happened for me. One night when I was about eight years old, I was caught in this delusion and avoiding my milk. At the end of the meal, Dad said I had to stay at the table until my milk glass was empty. I just stared at that full glass, and it stared back at me. It got warmer and warmer with each passing minute. Then Dad added ice cubes because I used the warmth as an excuse to stop drinking. Of course now it was an even worse situation. Skim milk is thin and skim milk with melting ice is horrible. I finally had to drink this wretched stuff. And as soon as I had a choice about beverages, I stopped drinking glasses of milk!

Since becoming a health coach, I have begun to wonder if the childhood me didn’t have an innate sense of what was really healthy for me. As an adult, I’ve learned that dairy is painfully disruptive to my digestion and inflammatory to my body. No matter your feelings about these foods, I want you to hear about the connection of diary and pain.

What’s Inflammatory about Dairy?

The conventional methods of processing and pasteurization (heating at high temperatures) denatures the protein, fat, and calcium that are considered the beneficial elements of dairy products. Thus, they are also generally inflammatory to our bodies.

Conventionally produced cow’s milk also contain xenoestrogens, synthetic growth hormones, and antibiotics. These are all inflammatory substances in our bodies.

The marketing engine for dairy products won’t tell us that we don’t actually need dairy products to survive. All of those elements I mentioned above—calcium, protein and fat—can be effectively received from alternate dietary sources. For example, dark green leafy vegetables are one of the richest (and most often untapped) sources of calcium available to us.

Another inflammatory issue with dairy items like cheese and ice cream is the way milk is super-concentrated to make them. Imagine not just one “layer” of milk, but many more “layers” or concentrations. So if you find that you have an inflammatory connection to milk, it may actually be even more difficult for your body to manage its highly concentrated forms.

Many of the food items that we think of as dairy are also loaded with sugar—things like yogurt, frozen yogurt and ice cream. That’s another strong inflammatory connection since sugar and pain are closely linked.

Cheeses that are the most inflammatory are those with mold, such as blue cheese, and soft varieties, such as Brie. Also if you are migraine-sensitive like I am, the harder cheeses, such as parmesan and cheddar, can be inflammatory as well due to the aging process. Molds used in blue and other cheeses are essentially a toxin to our bodies. They set off your natural defense system, creating inflammation to “protect” you from that toxin. Remember, a little inflammation for a short period of time IS protective. Inflammation leading to chronic pain is caused by long-term, high-volume ingestion of substances our body doesn’t know and doesn’t understand—so it will constantly “protect” us by creating major inflammation.

Quick Pitfall and Solution

Like many of the inflammatory foods we’ve talked about, dairy can be hidden on our ingredient lists with alternate names. This will be especially useful if you’re not getting the pain relief you hoped for from removing dairy from your diet. Some dairy-related ingredients include: hydrolyzed whey protein, lactose, lactablumin, lactalbumin phosphate, whey, casein, lactoglobulin, lactic acid, simplesse, whey protein isolate, and whey powder.

Steps to reducing your dairy consumption 

There is some possibility that you may find organic, grass-fed, naturally raised dairy to be less inflammatory and more tolerable. You may want to test these products after eliminating all conventionally produced dairy for at least a week or two.

There are also many non-dairy beverages available as options in our supermarkets. Almond, oat, rice, and hemp “milks” are all examples of these non-dairy beverages. I would caution you, however, to read your labels on these milk substitutes. They often contain carrageenan, which is a type of MSG and can also be inflammatory. An alternative here would be to make your own non-dairy beverage, like almond milk.

You can make some easy substitutions for dairy in your cooking. For example, a cup of broth can replace milk in a savory recipe. Pureed sweet potato or coconut milk can make recipes creamier. With a sweet recipe, you can use a non-dairy milk in equal quantities to the suggested cow’s milk. If you’re baking, an additional tablespoon of healthy non-inflammatory oil can maintain the richness and consistency of a recipe.

 

Do you just wish you could find a set of realistic, holistic tools you can put in practice that will minimize your pain and maximize your energy? Download my free PDF report to learn 17 EASY WAYS TO START MINIMIZING PAIN TODAY!

 

Read More

anti-inflammatory diet for holistic pain relief

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014 in Anti-Inflammatory Ideas, Cooking at Home, Healthier Choices, Holistic Pain Relief, Wellness | 0 comments

Anti-Inflammatory DietInflammation, in its ideal form, is the body’s response to infection and injury. When it works properly, it’s a solution addressing pain and invading organisms. But when inflammation is systemic (throughout our body), low-level and persistent, we are neither healed nor protected. Long-term inflammation can be a factor in chronic pain, as well as many illnesses including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, asthma, allergies, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s.

Inflammation is more common today because our bodies are out of balance. Our bodies produce chemicals called prostaglandins, using nutrients from the food we eat as a raw material. The major nutrients that our bodies use to create prostaglandins are fatty acids from our foods. These are the omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids produce an anti-inflammatory response in our bodies. Omega-6 fatty acids produce an inflammatory response.

Our bodies need an equal amount of each of these fatty acids to maintain a balanced inflammatory status. However, today’s “standard American diet” provides us with up to 20 times as much omega-6 fatty acid as omega-3 fatty acid.

The goal is to balance your food choices so that the sum of all foods eaten over the course of the day is in the positive, anti-inflammatory range.

What are the main sources of the inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids?

Sweets, starches (especially grains), and highly processed foods are the main culprits. We consume more cereal grains (and the oils produced from them) than ever before.

In addition, the animals we eat are also consuming increasing quantities of these grains (primarily corn). Even fish are being corn-fed in farms that raise seafood to meet our growing demands!

Does this mean I have to follow a highly restrictive diet?

No—it simply means you need to be aware of the balance of nutrients your body is receiving! Learn to make nutritional choices that support your body’s natural desire to create a balanced equilibrium of anti- and pro-inflammatory responses.

How do I know if a food is inflammatory?

Foods affect inflammation in complex and unpredictable ways. The IF Rating™ System is a new tool that takes the guesswork out of an anti-inflammatory diet by showing how different foods fuel or fight inflammation. Using the IF Ratings, you can create your own healing, inflammation-reducing diet.

The formula used to calculate the IF Ratings measures the effects of more than 20 different factors that determine a food’s inflammatory or anti-inflammatory potential, including:

  • amount and type of fat
  • essential fatty acids
  • vitamins, minerals and antioxidants
  • glycemic index
  • anti-inflammatory compounds

Components of an anti-inflammatory diet

Focus on meats, fish, eggs and leafy vegetables!

Low starch and other simple sugars: Insulin and high blood glucose are inflammatory. Have starch only in small portions (½ banana or one side of a hamburger bun) and preferably in unprocessed forms. Aim for less than 30 grams in any meal—less is healthier.

No high fructose corn syrup: High free fructose (in contrast to sucrose—table/white sugar) is inflammatory and contributes to cross linking of collagen fibers, which means prematurely aged skin. This doesn’t mean it’s better to switch to artificial sweeteners! Sucrose is much less inflammatory than alternative sweeteners.

High ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats: Most vegetable oils (olive oil is the exception) are very high in omega-6 fats and are inflammatory and should be avoided. Omega-3 fats from fish oil cannot have their full anti-inflammatory impact in the presence of vegetable oils, so consider how you cook them. Omega-3 supplements are often needed to overcome existing inflammation. For maximum absorption, be sure to take them at a meal where you also eat saturated fats.

No trans fats: All are inflammatory. Read ingredient lists and look for the words “partially hydrogenated.” Don’t believe “no trans fats” claims without reading the ingredient list!

Probiotics and prebiotics: The bacteria in your gut are vitally important in reducing inflammation. Most of the bacteria that initially colonize breastfed babies and are also present in fermented products seem to be helpful. A high-quality probiotic supplement can also be quite helpful.

Saturated fats are healthy and reduce the peroxidation of omega-3 fatty acids at sites of local inflammation, e.g. fatty liver. Saturated fats should be a significant source of dietary calories to balance you towards anti-inflammatory. Vegetable oils (corn, soy, cottonseed, safflower) are rich in omega-6 fatty acids and are dangerously inflammatory. These polyunsaturated oils are less healthy than saturated fats. Olive oil is the most healthy.

Vegetable antioxidants: Vegetables and fruits, along with coffee and chocolate supply very useful, anti-inflammatory anti-oxidants.

How can I balance inflammatory factors?

Here are some simple suggestions to add anti-inflammatory choices into your daily routine:

  • Exercise regularly
  • Minimize stress
  • Get a full night’s sleep
  • Eat whole foods, especially organic
  • Consider taking a high quality fish oil
  • Cook with aromatic spices – garlic, ginger, cayenne, turmeric are anti-inflammatory
  • Add avocado, kale, spinach, anchovies, wild Atlantic or sockeye salmon, Brazil nuts, and other anti-inflammatory foods

Mindful choices that add in more omega-3 fatty acids or develop relaxing behavior is the place to start! Making anti-inflammatory choices doesn’t have to feel like deprivation. Remember, everything is a balance.

Further Resources:

The Everything Anti-Inflammation Diet Book, by Karlyn Grimes

The Inflammation-Free Diet Plan, by Monica Reinagel (http://www.inflammationfactor.com)

Foods that Fight Fibromyalgia, by Deirdre Rawlings

Meals that Heal Inflammation, by Julie Daniluk

 

Do you just wish you could find a set of realistic, holistic tools you can put in practice that will minimize your pain and maximize your energy? Download my free PDF report to learn 17 EASY WAYS TO START MINIMIZING PAIN TODAY!

Read More

9 reasons why smoothies are a fantastic breakfast choice

Posted by on Sep 4, 2013 in Anti-Inflammatory Ideas, Cooking at Home, Gluten Free, Healthier Choices, Holistic Pain Relief, Wellness | 0 comments

SmoothiesIf you’ve spent any time with me in person or here on the blog, you know that I LOVE smoothies. They are definitely one of my favorite natural remedies for pain relief. I’ve been having breakfast smoothies for over ten years. So long that I don’t even remember why I originally started making them for breakfast. But I definitely know why I make them NOW! Here are my top nine reasons:

  1. You can make your own in 5 minutes: You just need a blender & ingredients, the preparation is super quick and easy!
  2. They are anti-inflammatory and help create pain relief: Smoothies are naturally grain and gluten free, which is a wonderful anti-inflammatory choice.
  3. You can pack every bite with TONS of nutrition: So many superfoods are the perfect fit with a smoothie. For example, add some blueberries and a teaspoon of cinnamon or ginger. Fantastic for you and so EASY!
  4. You’ll never miss the gluten or dairy: Switching the milk or yogurt for a non-dairy milk doesn’t change the taste in the least. You’ll never miss it!
  5. They help your digestion: Having a liquid breakfast is super easy on your body. It allows the overnight digestion to continue (to a lesser extent) during the morning.
  6. You can save a cup of smoothie for dessert after dinner: If you love a little bit of sweetness at night, just make a bit of extra smoothie and refrigerate it in a glass jar during the day. Healthy and yummy!
  7. Even kids like them – and you can hide a vegetable serving in there for them: My teenage granddaughter just told me the other day that she has a smoothie in the morning now. Her mom puts kale in it, and my granddaughter says, “You can’t even tell!”
  8. If you must eat in the car, you can drink your smoothie: I’d rather eat my smoothie while sitting still at the table. But if your morning is crazy busy, make it a little thinner and take it in the car. You’ll still gain plenty of benefits.
  9. It’s hydration the easy way: Many mornings I use part water and part almond milk in my smoothie. Every little bit of extra hydration we can get is a boost for pain relief!
  10. BONUS: there are so many flavor options that you’ll never get tired of them: Here’s a link to my smoothie Pinterest Board with tons of great ideas. Try some and let me know what you think!

 

Do you just wish you could find a set of realistic, holistic tools you can put in practice that will minimize your pain and maximize your energy? Download my free PDF report to learn 17 EASY WAYS TO START MINIMIZING PAIN TODAY!

 

 

Read More

easy recipe to add anti-inflammatory spices into your life

Posted by on Aug 1, 2013 in Anti-Inflammatory Ideas, Cooking at Home, Gluten Free, Healthier Choices, Wellness | 0 comments

When I posted my blog a few weeks ago called, “7 Holistic Changes That Improve Pain Relief,” my Twitter friend Lauri Boone (@LauriBoone) mentioned another option—spices that decrease inflammation. Since she talks about them in her book, “Powerful Plant-Based Super Foods,” I asked her to guest blog in the fall and teach us more. I hope you’re as excited about her information as I am about being able to share it with you!

Energy truffles are a great anti-inflammatory snack!

Energy truffles are a great anti-inflammatory snack!

In the meantime, what are some of these spices? My favorites are cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, and turmeric. And today I’m going to share with you a recipe that I love because it includes ALL FOUR of these spices. And it’s really, really easy!

 

Anti-Inflammtory Energy Truffles

1 cup raw almonds
6 pitted medjool dates
¼ cup unsweetened flaked coconut
¼ cup almond butter
1/8 cup coconut oil
2 tablespoons raw honey (optional)
2 tablespoons carob or raw cacao powder
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ginger
¼ teaspoon turmeric
pinch of cayenne pepper (to taste)

Put almonds in a food processor and process to a medium fine powder. Remove from food processor to a separate bowl. Process pitted dates and flaked coconut together to form a paste. Return almonds to the food processor and add all of the other ingredients. Process until mixture is a smooth paste. Add a bit of non-dairy milk or coconut oil if mix is too dry. Form into small balls. Roll in carob powder or coconut if desired. Stored in refrigerator, truffles will keep for one week.

Each truffle is about 80-90 calories, but every calorie is packed with nutrients and anti-inflammatory value. They make a fantastic snack, and you really won’t find yourself eating more than a couple at a time because they are also rich and satisfying.

Let me know how you like them, okay?

Do you just wish you could find a set of realistic, holistic tools you can put in practice that will minimize your pain and maximize your energy? Download my free PDF report to learn 17 EASY WAYS TO START MINIMIZING PAIN TODAY!

Read More

anti-inflammatory health & wellness choices

Posted by on Apr 11, 2013 in Anti-Inflammatory Ideas, Wellness | 0 comments

Inflammation, in its ideal form, is the body’s response to infection and injury. When it works properly, it’s a solution addressing acute pain and invading organisms. But when inflammation is systemic (throughout our body), low-level and persistent, we are neither healed nor protected. Long-term inflammation can be a factor in chronic pain, as well as many illnesses including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, asthma, allergies, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s.

Inflammation is more common today because our bodies are out of balance. Our bodies produce chemicals called prostaglandins, using nutrients from the food we eat as a raw material. The major nutrients that our bodies use to create prostaglandins are fatty acids from our foods. These are the omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids produce an anti-inflammatory response in our bodies. Omega-6 fatty acids produce an inflammatory response.

Our bodies need an equal amount of each of these fatty acids to maintain a balanced inflammatory status. However, today’s “standard American diet” provides us with up to 20 times as much omega-6 fatty acid as omega-3 fatty acid.

What are the main sources of the inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids?
Sweets, starches (especially grains), and highly processed foods are the main culprits. We consume more cereal grains (and the oils produced from them) than ever before. In addition, the animals we eat are also consuming increasing quantities of these grains (primarily corn). Even fish are being corn-fed in farms that raise seafood to meet our growing demands!

How can I balance these inflammatory factors? Here are some simple suggestions to add anti-inflammatory choices into your daily routine:

  • Exercise regularly
  • Minimize stress
  • Get a full night’s sleep
  • Eat whole foods, especially organic
  • Consider taking a high quality fish oil
  • Cook with aromatic spices – garlic, ginger, cayenne, turmeric are anti-inflammatory
  • Add avocado, kale, spinach, anchovies, wild Atlantic or sockeye salmon, Brazil nuts, and other anti-inflammatory foods

Mindful choices that add in more omega-3 fatty acids or develop relaxing behavior is the place to start! Making anti-inflammatory choices doesn’t have to feel like deprivation. Remember, everything is a balance.

 

__________________

Do you just wish you could find a set of realistic, holistic tools you can put in practice that will minimize your pain and maximize your energy? Download my free audio teleclass to learn YOUR MOST IMPORTANT STEP TO MINIMIZE PAIN!

Read More
Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On LinkedinVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On Youtube